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Idea by

2001

2001

http://www.2001.lu

115A rue emile mark, Differdange, Luxembourg
Philippe Nathan (Esch-Alzette, Luxembourg 1982) is an architect by education. After having collaborated with Brussels-based architecture office ‘51N4E’ for 3 years, he returned to Luxembourg in 2010 to found the office ‘2001’. ‘2001’ is a studio – atelier – labo, which is concerned with territories, buildings, spaces and ideas/strategies. In the framework of ‘2001’, he develops -among others- exhibition designs, spatial installations buildings and territorial strategies.

Growing Limits to Growth


A fantasy on a new vernacular residential typology

Growing Limits to Growth


A fantasy on a new vernacular residential typology
The blunt concept would be, to “stack” villas on top of each other, in order to fully exploit the value (and/or cost) of the building plot - an approach enabling to bypass the spacio-vorous characteristics of the suburban house.

An optimized beam column structure would center the closed, i.e. heated area, which is connected to stairs and elevators, offering a ceiling height of 6 meters, allowing for a customized generous second floor.

The slabs between floors would be based on trusses, with maximum span widths and exterior cantilevers. The important height of these slabs guarantees maximum flexibility for the interior plan layout, and on the outside cantilevers, for the integration of soil and plants.
Moreover, this dwelling lifestyle would enable a new reading of- and a new clarity to the landscape, by introducing axes, visual limits and referenced landmarks to an otherwise dull horizon. An enlightened way of laying out the buildings would simplify traffic and connectivity as much as collective infrastructures.
Gone the days when endless housing estates spread like grey goo over the fields, as in this case, the residential buildings would serve in framing and drawing a new, shared, landscape.


Growing Limits to Growth


A fantasy on a new vernacular residential typology

Growing Limits to Growth


A fantasy on a new vernacular residential typology
The blunt concept would be, to “stack” villas on top of each other, in order to fully exploit the value (and/or cost) of the building plot - an approach enabling to bypass the spacio-vorous characteristics of the suburban house.

An optimized beam column structure would center the closed, i.e. heated area, which is connected to stairs and elevators, offering a ceiling height of 6 meters, allowing for a customized generous second floor.

The slabs between floors would be based on trusses, with maximum span widths and exterior cantilevers. The important height of these slabs guarantees maximum flexibility for the interior plan layout, and on the outside cantilevers, for the integration of soil and plants.
Moreover, this dwelling lifestyle would enable a new reading of- and a new clarity to the landscape, by introducing axes, visual limits and referenced landmarks to an otherwise dull horizon. An enlightened way of laying out the buildings would simplify traffic and connectivity as much as collective infrastructures.
Gone the days when endless housing estates spread like grey goo over the fields, as in this case, the residential buildings would serve in framing and drawing a new, shared, landscape.



Idea by

2001
2001
115A rue emile mark
Differdange
Luxembourg
Philippe Nathan (Esch-Alzette, Luxembourg 1982) is an architect by education. After having collaborated with Brussels-based architecture office ‘51N4E’ for 3 years, he returned to Luxembourg in 2010 to found the office ‘2001’. ‘2001’ is a studio – atelier – labo, which is concerned with territories, buildings, spaces and ideas/strategies. In the framework of ‘2001’, he develops -among others- exhibition designs, spatial installations buildings and territorial strategies.