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Idea by

Nikola Nikolovski

Skopje, Macedonia
Nikola Nikolovski is a Macedonian architect and researcher currently based in San Francisco. He studied in Skopje and Tokyo, and graduated with a PhD from the University of Tokyo as part of Kengo Kuma Laboratory. His research focuses on historical case studies and their impact on the present state of architecture. As a practicing architect, he has worked in Russia, Japan, the USA and his native Macedonia.

Constructing Japan-ness


Japanese Architecture in European Architectural Periodicals

Constructing Japan-ness


Japanese Architecture in European Architectural Periodicals
A study of European architectural periodicals and their role in shaping architectural discourse.
File under
Type of project
  • Systemic changes

A diverse group of Japanese architects with different design philosophies create the notion of Japanese architecture as a monolithic and well-established architectural discourse. This study examines how, in an era of globalized architectural language, these architects were able and continue to sustain their Japanese “distinction” and national character. They manage to break the Eurocentrism in architecture and, in some periods, provide the sole alternative to the West. The project examines the history of establishing the contemporary Japanese discourse and traces its narrative through architectural periodicals as the most important media used by architects to communicate their ideas in the 20th century. Following several European magazines the research traces the changes in representation and contextualization of Japanese architecture for the European audience and examines the construction of Japan-ness in architecture. What does Japan-ness in architecture mean and how is it sustained?


Architectural Design + Casabella + l'Architecture d'Aujourd'hui: 20 special issues presenting Japanese architecture and 2 issues dedicated Japanese architects (Arata Isozaki and Tadao Ando)

January 1970, Architectural Design - issue dedicated to Arata Isozaki

Architectural Design + Casabella + l'Architecture d'Aujourd'hui: articles published from 1955 to 2005

Constructing Japan-ness


Japanese Architecture in European Architectural Periodicals

Constructing Japan-ness


Japanese Architecture in European Architectural Periodicals
A study of European architectural periodicals and their role in shaping architectural discourse.
File under
Type of project
  • Systemic changes

A diverse group of Japanese architects with different design philosophies create the notion of Japanese architecture as a monolithic and well-established architectural discourse. This study examines how, in an era of globalized architectural language, these architects were able and continue to sustain their Japanese “distinction” and national character. They manage to break the Eurocentrism in architecture and, in some periods, provide the sole alternative to the West. The project examines the history of establishing the contemporary Japanese discourse and traces its narrative through architectural periodicals as the most important media used by architects to communicate their ideas in the 20th century. Following several European magazines the research traces the changes in representation and contextualization of Japanese architecture for the European audience and examines the construction of Japan-ness in architecture. What does Japan-ness in architecture mean and how is it sustained?


Architectural Design + Casabella + l'Architecture d'Aujourd'hui: 20 special issues presenting Japanese architecture and 2 issues dedicated Japanese architects (Arata Isozaki and Tadao Ando)

January 1970, Architectural Design - issue dedicated to Arata Isozaki

Architectural Design + Casabella + l'Architecture d'Aujourd'hui: articles published from 1955 to 2005


Idea by

Nikola Nikolovski
Skopje
Macedonia
Nikola Nikolovski is a Macedonian architect and researcher currently based in San Francisco. He studied in Skopje and Tokyo, and graduated with a PhD from the University of Tokyo as part of Kengo Kuma Laboratory. His research focuses on historical case studies and their impact on the present state of architecture. As a practicing architect, he has worked in Russia, Japan, the USA and his native Macedonia.