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Idea by

Robert van der Pol & Erica Chladov√°

LMNL

http://liminaloffice.com

Lusthofstraat 52B, Rotterdam, Netherlands
LMNL (Liminal Office) is a Rotterdam based studio that explores the relationship between architecture and landscape. Our work seeks to merge the building and the environment, focusing on the liminal space between inside and outside. We believe in designs where the built form and living landscape benefit from and interact seamlessly with one other. Our goal is to design that interaction between architecture and its landscape to create more playful, powerful and liveable places.

The Landscapes of Buildings


A reciprocal relationship between architecture and its environment

The Landscapes of Buildings


A reciprocal relationship between architecture and its environment
Future architecture should advocate for more inspiring surrounding landscapes.

Many architects lose control of the spaces surrounding their designs. This may be due to bad planning, divisions between public/private investments, lack of knowledge, or value engineering, but it can often lead to a downward spiral of neglect that eventually undermines the value of the structure.

Even well designed buildings placed in subpar surroundings stand less of a chance of retaining value and being appreciated by occupants - leading to blight and demolition.

When an architect delivers a building it is at its best on day one. When a landscape is designed it takes time for it to mature. This discrepancy in timelines can only be equalized with proper investment in maintenance. Buildings must surpass the average 40 year lifespan and landscapes must be cared for so as to reach their full potential.

Buildings and landscapes have a reciprocal value for owners and occupants and enhance the quality of life of the future city. They must always be at their best.


Life of a building in dull surroundings

Life of a building in a vibrant landscape

Graph showing the change in value of a building in a subpar landscape

Graph showing the change in value of a building in a dynamic landscape

The Landscapes of Buildings


A reciprocal relationship between architecture and its environment

The Landscapes of Buildings


A reciprocal relationship between architecture and its environment
Future architecture should advocate for more inspiring surrounding landscapes.

Many architects lose control of the spaces surrounding their designs. This may be due to bad planning, divisions between public/private investments, lack of knowledge, or value engineering, but it can often lead to a downward spiral of neglect that eventually undermines the value of the structure.

Even well designed buildings placed in subpar surroundings stand less of a chance of retaining value and being appreciated by occupants - leading to blight and demolition.

When an architect delivers a building it is at its best on day one. When a landscape is designed it takes time for it to mature. This discrepancy in timelines can only be equalized with proper investment in maintenance. Buildings must surpass the average 40 year lifespan and landscapes must be cared for so as to reach their full potential.

Buildings and landscapes have a reciprocal value for owners and occupants and enhance the quality of life of the future city. They must always be at their best.


Life of a building in dull surroundings

Life of a building in a vibrant landscape

Graph showing the change in value of a building in a subpar landscape

Graph showing the change in value of a building in a dynamic landscape


Idea by

Robert van der Pol & Erica Chladov√°
LMNL
Lusthofstraat 52B
Rotterdam
Netherlands
LMNL (Liminal Office) is a Rotterdam based studio that explores the relationship between architecture and landscape. Our work seeks to merge the building and the environment, focusing on the liminal space between inside and outside. We believe in designs where the built form and living landscape benefit from and interact seamlessly with one other. Our goal is to design that interaction between architecture and its landscape to create more playful, powerful and liveable places.