Search

Idea by

Dmytro Isaiev

Leipzigskaya, Kyiv, Ukraine
Hello. My name is Dmytro Isaiev. I am an architect from Kyiv. A focus of my interest in architecture is a context-oriented approach and respectful attitude towards nature and local communities. I am interested in the phenomena of mass tourism in modern societies. How architecture can respond to realities where the world becoming smaller and more accessible than ever? How architecture can preserve uniqueness and diversity of places and destinations?

Himalayan crossroads


future of tourism in hard reachable regions

Himalayan crossroads


future of tourism in hard reachable regions
What is the future of tourism and more importantly - what is the future of tourist destinations in more and more accessible world?
File under
Type of project
  • Systemic changes

We live in an era where places considered virtually unreachable 60 years ago now can be reached in a matter of days. The world becomes small and homogeneous. Sagarmatha National Park in Nepal is home to the highest peak in the world, Mount Everest. The 65-kilometer trek route to the Everest Base Camp has become a major tourist attraction drawing tens of thousands of people every year. However, this rise in popularity has triggered a change in the traditional lifestyle of local communities. The previously self-dependent and self-sufficient villages along the route, have turned into resting places for tourists.
Flat terraces are literary main wealth here. Traditionally locals used to grow rice and potatoes here, but now they are occupied by hotels designed to accommodate visitors. Full during the high tourist season - between October and December, and February and May - for the rest of the year all these hotels stand empty.
What will happen when there is no more space to expand?


Sagarmatha National Park (SNP) in Nepal is home to the highest peak in the world, Mount Everest. The 65-kilometer trek route to the Everest Base Camp has become a major tourist attraction drawing tens of thousands of people every year. However, this rise in popularity has triggered a change in the traditional lifestyle of local communities. The previously self-dependent and self-sufficient villages along the route, have turned into resting places for tourists.

In order to demonstrate new strategies of development 3 sites were picked. Nature and climate conditions- as well as altitude, landscape, and built environment, differ dramatically from site to site.

In the core of my interests are three main categories - nature conditions, local culture life cycle, seasonal tourism cycle. By intersecting them we can derive program needs of local communities as well as tourists and create scenarios where the cultural exchange between locals and foreigners take place and aiming to benefit the locals and tourists alike.

Al three sites are built with the use of local materials and traditional techniques and process. All three use unique local conditions in order to create pilot projects, which later can be used as a framework for further development along the route, and other high-altitude hard reachable regions around the globe.

Proposal investigates the possibilities of alternative ways of development, where economic growth is not the main force anymore.

Himalayan crossroads


future of tourism in hard reachable regions

Himalayan crossroads


future of tourism in hard reachable regions
What is the future of tourism and more importantly - what is the future of tourist destinations in more and more accessible world?
File under
Type of project
  • Systemic changes

We live in an era where places considered virtually unreachable 60 years ago now can be reached in a matter of days. The world becomes small and homogeneous. Sagarmatha National Park in Nepal is home to the highest peak in the world, Mount Everest. The 65-kilometer trek route to the Everest Base Camp has become a major tourist attraction drawing tens of thousands of people every year. However, this rise in popularity has triggered a change in the traditional lifestyle of local communities. The previously self-dependent and self-sufficient villages along the route, have turned into resting places for tourists.
Flat terraces are literary main wealth here. Traditionally locals used to grow rice and potatoes here, but now they are occupied by hotels designed to accommodate visitors. Full during the high tourist season - between October and December, and February and May - for the rest of the year all these hotels stand empty.
What will happen when there is no more space to expand?


Sagarmatha National Park (SNP) in Nepal is home to the highest peak in the world, Mount Everest. The 65-kilometer trek route to the Everest Base Camp has become a major tourist attraction drawing tens of thousands of people every year. However, this rise in popularity has triggered a change in the traditional lifestyle of local communities. The previously self-dependent and self-sufficient villages along the route, have turned into resting places for tourists.

In order to demonstrate new strategies of development 3 sites were picked. Nature and climate conditions- as well as altitude, landscape, and built environment, differ dramatically from site to site.

In the core of my interests are three main categories - nature conditions, local culture life cycle, seasonal tourism cycle. By intersecting them we can derive program needs of local communities as well as tourists and create scenarios where the cultural exchange between locals and foreigners take place and aiming to benefit the locals and tourists alike.

Al three sites are built with the use of local materials and traditional techniques and process. All three use unique local conditions in order to create pilot projects, which later can be used as a framework for further development along the route, and other high-altitude hard reachable regions around the globe.

Proposal investigates the possibilities of alternative ways of development, where economic growth is not the main force anymore.


Idea by

Dmytro Isaiev
Leipzigskaya
Kyiv
Ukraine
Hello. My name is Dmytro Isaiev. I am an architect from Kyiv. A focus of my interest in architecture is a context-oriented approach and respectful attitude towards nature and local communities. I am interested in the phenomena of mass tourism in modern societies. How architecture can respond to realities where the world becoming smaller and more accessible than ever? How architecture can preserve uniqueness and diversity of places and destinations?