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Idea by

Astrid Cam Aguinaga, Jupille Facile and Presna Parnel

Astrid Cam Aguinaga

http://haiti.aaschool.ac.uk/portfolio/2016-group-4/

12 Harrison St, Somerville, United States of America
Met and worked together during the AA Haiti Visiting School workshop in Port-au-Prince. Astrid is a Peruvian Architect currently undergoing graduate studies at Harvard GSD with her focus being Social Architecture; Jupille is a Haitian Civil Engineer student at University Quisqueya who changed his path from Medicine to Engineering after seeing the impact of the 2010 earthquake in Haiti; and Presna is in construction and has previously worked in the repair of the Dufort House by FOKAL.

Kay Idantite


Kay Idantite


Architecture’s future will be embodied by low-cost sustainable construction techniques and materials.

The threat of climate change and uncontrolled exploitation of earth’s resources, urge us all to reevaluate our lifestyles and consumption. This issue impacts the field of architecture greatly, as the generated waste and the kind of synthetic materials used in construction deeply aggravate the problem. An exponentially growing population demands consumption for more resources, one of them being housing –most of them living under the poverty line, especially in developing nations- which is why is it now more important than ever to start thinking about innovative and creative ways to bring back ancient construction techniques that are proven to be effective. To start working with sustainable, locally available materials and employ local labor as well, dramatically decreases the overall cost of construction as well as carbon footprint. Thus, increasing the possibilities of poor families to access decent housing and an improved lifestyle.


Schematic of how the house could be divided in case of two different families (left) and Plans of the House : Ground Level and First Level (right)

Elevations on four sides of the project (left) and Inside views of the balcony and gallery spaces (right).

Exploded Axonometric View of the Project and its components, including bahareque-built walls and bamboo core structure.

Facade treatment, including information regarding the management of the off-cuts of the residual bamboo.

Rainwater Collection within the project.

Kay Idantite


Kay Idantite


Architecture’s future will be embodied by low-cost sustainable construction techniques and materials.

The threat of climate change and uncontrolled exploitation of earth’s resources, urge us all to reevaluate our lifestyles and consumption. This issue impacts the field of architecture greatly, as the generated waste and the kind of synthetic materials used in construction deeply aggravate the problem. An exponentially growing population demands consumption for more resources, one of them being housing –most of them living under the poverty line, especially in developing nations- which is why is it now more important than ever to start thinking about innovative and creative ways to bring back ancient construction techniques that are proven to be effective. To start working with sustainable, locally available materials and employ local labor as well, dramatically decreases the overall cost of construction as well as carbon footprint. Thus, increasing the possibilities of poor families to access decent housing and an improved lifestyle.


Schematic of how the house could be divided in case of two different families (left) and Plans of the House : Ground Level and First Level (right)

Elevations on four sides of the project (left) and Inside views of the balcony and gallery spaces (right).

Exploded Axonometric View of the Project and its components, including bahareque-built walls and bamboo core structure.

Facade treatment, including information regarding the management of the off-cuts of the residual bamboo.

Rainwater Collection within the project.


Idea by

Astrid Cam Aguinaga, Jupille Facile and Presna Parnel
Astrid Cam Aguinaga
12 Harrison St
Somerville
United States of America
Met and worked together during the AA Haiti Visiting School workshop in Port-au-Prince. Astrid is a Peruvian Architect currently undergoing graduate studies at Harvard GSD with her focus being Social Architecture; Jupille is a Haitian Civil Engineer student at University Quisqueya who changed his path from Medicine to Engineering after seeing the impact of the 2010 earthquake in Haiti; and Presna is in construction and has previously worked in the repair of the Dufort House by FOKAL.