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Idea by

Dimitris Anagnostopoulos

Analipsis, Greece
Dimitris Anagnostopoulos is an Architect and Urban Planner based in Greece. He holds a diploma in Architecture from University of Patras, Greece and a Master of Advanced Studies in Urban Design from ETH Zurich.

Oceanis


Cities in the Sea

Oceanis


Cities in the Sea
Hybrid cities create new kinds of Urbanism

Some 1.011.712 people reached Europe by sea in 2015, forced by civil wars, insecurity and poverty. European Union struggling under its first major economic and political crisis seems to be unable to welcome the migration flows.
At the same time, companies confronted with sides of capitalism that have never been seen before, try to find new ways to bypass the system as we know it today.
These two different needs that come from opposite directions meet in the middle of the sea. New born cities floating on the international waters 12 miles away from land, take advance of the gap that exists so far about the parenthood of the oceans. Immigrants find a safe place to establish and develop and companies find competitive labor cost and proximity to the markets.
Each one of the floating cities corresponds to an already existing one as the home city creates a symbiotic dipole importing a new kind of urbanism and a new economic and social network that has never existed before.


Each one of the city, is born as a safe cell and grows according to the forces of capitalism and migration flows that now cooperate for common benefit.

The migration flows and the new cities network

It doesn’t look like a city as we already know; neither does it act like one.

The new land that is going to be created doesn’t belong to anyone.

The city’s layout

Oceanis


Cities in the Sea

Oceanis


Cities in the Sea
Hybrid cities create new kinds of Urbanism

Some 1.011.712 people reached Europe by sea in 2015, forced by civil wars, insecurity and poverty. European Union struggling under its first major economic and political crisis seems to be unable to welcome the migration flows.
At the same time, companies confronted with sides of capitalism that have never been seen before, try to find new ways to bypass the system as we know it today.
These two different needs that come from opposite directions meet in the middle of the sea. New born cities floating on the international waters 12 miles away from land, take advance of the gap that exists so far about the parenthood of the oceans. Immigrants find a safe place to establish and develop and companies find competitive labor cost and proximity to the markets.
Each one of the floating cities corresponds to an already existing one as the home city creates a symbiotic dipole importing a new kind of urbanism and a new economic and social network that has never existed before.


Each one of the city, is born as a safe cell and grows according to the forces of capitalism and migration flows that now cooperate for common benefit.

The migration flows and the new cities network

It doesn’t look like a city as we already know; neither does it act like one.

The new land that is going to be created doesn’t belong to anyone.

The city’s layout


Idea by

Dimitris Anagnostopoulos
Analipsis
Greece
Dimitris Anagnostopoulos is an Architect and Urban Planner based in Greece. He holds a diploma in Architecture from University of Patras, Greece and a Master of Advanced Studies in Urban Design from ETH Zurich.