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Idea by

Andreas Papallas

http://www.andreaspapallas.com

Larnaca, Cyprus
Andreas Papallas studied Architecture at the University of Sheffield and Architecture and Urban Design at the University of Cambridge. His thesis project Urban Rapprochement Tactics set out to explore the role of space in ameliorating inter-ethnic tensions and encouraging meaningful interaction. He has completed posts at the University of Cyprus and the Centre for Urban Conflicts Research. His interest lies in evaluating, analysing and visualising complex urban conditions.

Learning from Urban Conflicts


A two-year long journey mapping urban conflicts in Nicosia, Baghdad, Sarajevo and Derry/Londonderry

Learning from Urban Conflicts


A two-year long journey mapping urban conflicts in Nicosia, Baghdad, Sarajevo and Derry/Londonderry
We need to create tolerant, cosmopolitan cities and openly advocate against practices of exclusion

In the aftermath of 9/11, a shift has been observed towards the exclusion of domestication of the stranger. The number of refugees and migrants travelling across the Mediterranean and Southern-Eastern Europe has been increasing exponentially. Incidents of xenophobia and racism have emerged wildly and widely while the European project and the Schengen zone have been brought into question. In our near future Britain will leave the EU and Donald Trump's presidency is set out to be the biggest American tragedy. Now, more than ever, cities need to be places of inclusion for all the people regardless of race, ethnicity or gender. Mapping urban conflicts in Nicosia, Baghdad, Sarajevo and Derry/Londonderry, where segregation has been at the extremes, reveal the importance of urban planning and public space in ameliorating tensions and encouraging interactions. Architects and urban planners have a duty to create tolerant, cosmopolitan cities and openly advocate against practices of exclusion.



Learning from Urban Conflicts


A two-year long journey mapping urban conflicts in Nicosia, Baghdad, Sarajevo and Derry/Londonderry

Learning from Urban Conflicts


A two-year long journey mapping urban conflicts in Nicosia, Baghdad, Sarajevo and Derry/Londonderry
We need to create tolerant, cosmopolitan cities and openly advocate against practices of exclusion

In the aftermath of 9/11, a shift has been observed towards the exclusion of domestication of the stranger. The number of refugees and migrants travelling across the Mediterranean and Southern-Eastern Europe has been increasing exponentially. Incidents of xenophobia and racism have emerged wildly and widely while the European project and the Schengen zone have been brought into question. In our near future Britain will leave the EU and Donald Trump's presidency is set out to be the biggest American tragedy. Now, more than ever, cities need to be places of inclusion for all the people regardless of race, ethnicity or gender. Mapping urban conflicts in Nicosia, Baghdad, Sarajevo and Derry/Londonderry, where segregation has been at the extremes, reveal the importance of urban planning and public space in ameliorating tensions and encouraging interactions. Architects and urban planners have a duty to create tolerant, cosmopolitan cities and openly advocate against practices of exclusion.




Idea by

Andreas Papallas
Larnaca
Cyprus
Andreas Papallas studied Architecture at the University of Sheffield and Architecture and Urban Design at the University of Cambridge. His thesis project Urban Rapprochement Tactics set out to explore the role of space in ameliorating inter-ethnic tensions and encouraging meaningful interaction. He has completed posts at the University of Cyprus and the Centre for Urban Conflicts Research. His interest lies in evaluating, analysing and visualising complex urban conditions.