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Idea by

Pranathi and Nripal Adhikary

ABARI Bamboo and Earth Initiative

http://abari.earth/

#314,near Kumari Cinemas, Dhobidhara Marg, Nepal
Nripal and Pranathi are a husband wife team of Designer-Architect and Builders. They run their practice ABARI which specializes in the use of natural materials such as earth and bamboo in their projects. They have developed a bamboo supply chain which not only supplies them with the bamboo they use in construction and product design but also specifically has created a green corridor in what was once a land ravaged by floods.

Treading softly


An architecture co-evolving with the society and ecology.

Treading softly


An architecture co-evolving with the society and ecology.
Creating ecological spaces using sustainable, local materials crafted with local communities.
File under
Type of project
  • Systemic changes

We are a crafts-based design firm. We work closely with craftsmen and farmers. We have created supply chains for the materials we use and source most other materials locally. We have planted bamboo along a flood prone river bank with tropical farmers' communities who we buy back from.It is a model which is a win-win for the ecology and the communities.

Our process from design to finishing the building have taken inspiration from vernacular traditions of working with nature and people.
Using the materials that we have consciously nurtured, in collaboration with our new generation of craftsmen, we create architectural spaces and bespoke furniture.

Our inspiration comes from the indigenous communities' ethos of living close to nature, minimally, without being extractive in nature.
We want to demonstrate that one can live a healthy, sustainable life by conscientiously harnessing resources that surround us.



The learning centre is built using rammed earth and bamboo.

Demonstration of tropical home using bamboo and earth close to the flood prone areas.

Cafe built with bamboo and earth

Post earthquake demonstration house with bamboo and rammed earth

Meditation and yoga studio with earth and bamboo

Treading softly


An architecture co-evolving with the society and ecology.

Treading softly


An architecture co-evolving with the society and ecology.
Creating ecological spaces using sustainable, local materials crafted with local communities.
File under
Type of project
  • Systemic changes

We are a crafts-based design firm. We work closely with craftsmen and farmers. We have created supply chains for the materials we use and source most other materials locally. We have planted bamboo along a flood prone river bank with tropical farmers' communities who we buy back from.It is a model which is a win-win for the ecology and the communities.

Our process from design to finishing the building have taken inspiration from vernacular traditions of working with nature and people.
Using the materials that we have consciously nurtured, in collaboration with our new generation of craftsmen, we create architectural spaces and bespoke furniture.

Our inspiration comes from the indigenous communities' ethos of living close to nature, minimally, without being extractive in nature.
We want to demonstrate that one can live a healthy, sustainable life by conscientiously harnessing resources that surround us.



The learning centre is built using rammed earth and bamboo.

Demonstration of tropical home using bamboo and earth close to the flood prone areas.

Cafe built with bamboo and earth

Post earthquake demonstration house with bamboo and rammed earth

Meditation and yoga studio with earth and bamboo


Idea by

Pranathi and Nripal Adhikary
ABARI Bamboo and Earth Initiative
#314,near Kumari Cinemas
Dhobidhara Marg
Nepal
Nripal and Pranathi are a husband wife team of Designer-Architect and Builders. They run their practice ABARI which specializes in the use of natural materials such as earth and bamboo in their projects. They have developed a bamboo supply chain which not only supplies them with the bamboo they use in construction and product design but also specifically has created a green corridor in what was once a land ravaged by floods.