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Idea by

Bong Yeung

8 Fuk Lee Street, Tai Kok Tsui, Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Born in Hong Kong, Bong Yeung studied Architecture and graduated from the Bartlett in 2011. Acquired Dean’s List for ‘Distinction in Design’ and Merit in Thesis during my final year, he had been selected by Blueprint Magazine as ‘one of the Best of the Student Shows’. He had worked on a few projects in London, Oxford and Exeter and became an UK Registered Architect in 2014. He is currently based in Foster + Partners Hong Kong office responsible for a few high profiled project in Asia.

Architecture of Waste


How failed fruit and vegetables could potentially generate sustainable energy?

Architecture of Waste


How failed fruit and vegetables could potentially generate sustainable energy?
An architecture that would turn failed (by not passing EU Marketing Standards) fruit and vegetables into sustainable energy.
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Lea Valley, London has been chosen as the site. It has been a socially and economically deprived area, but also has a remarkable history of horticultural industry in the last century. The proposed super-farm will be an urban regeneration project through urban strategies, which could generate self-sufficiency at 43.7% in 7,933 hectares of land. I have explored the potential agricultural technologies that can boost the levels of productivity and environmental performance: hydroponic farming and the closed-glasshouse system. Thanet Earth and Sky Farm provide examples which I have examined and analysed the technical data of hydroponic farming. The architecture will be responsible to distribution and the use of anaerobic digesters to convert “non-standard” failed produce into bio-fuel, suggesting that 400,000 local households could have energy provision from this source in London. The project attempts to response the challenges of food and fuel supplies that the UK faces in the future.


Architecture of Waste


How failed fruit and vegetables could potentially generate sustainable energy?

Architecture of Waste


How failed fruit and vegetables could potentially generate sustainable energy?
An architecture that would turn failed (by not passing EU Marketing Standards) fruit and vegetables into sustainable energy.
File under

Lea Valley, London has been chosen as the site. It has been a socially and economically deprived area, but also has a remarkable history of horticultural industry in the last century. The proposed super-farm will be an urban regeneration project through urban strategies, which could generate self-sufficiency at 43.7% in 7,933 hectares of land. I have explored the potential agricultural technologies that can boost the levels of productivity and environmental performance: hydroponic farming and the closed-glasshouse system. Thanet Earth and Sky Farm provide examples which I have examined and analysed the technical data of hydroponic farming. The architecture will be responsible to distribution and the use of anaerobic digesters to convert “non-standard” failed produce into bio-fuel, suggesting that 400,000 local households could have energy provision from this source in London. The project attempts to response the challenges of food and fuel supplies that the UK faces in the future.



Idea by

Bong Yeung
8 Fuk Lee Street, Tai Kok Tsui
Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Born in Hong Kong, Bong Yeung studied Architecture and graduated from the Bartlett in 2011. Acquired Dean’s List for ‘Distinction in Design’ and Merit in Thesis during my final year, he had been selected by Blueprint Magazine as ‘one of the Best of the Student Shows’. He had worked on a few projects in London, Oxford and Exeter and became an UK Registered Architect in 2014. He is currently based in Foster + Partners Hong Kong office responsible for a few high profiled project in Asia.