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Idea by

Maisa Imamović

august vermeylenstraat 44, amsterdam, Netherlands
Maisa is a multi-doer. She is currently on her way to become a full-stack web-developer, with a degree in Architectural design. In between those two major occupations, her truest form of being is that of a writer. Of theory, and humans. She likes to work as much as not-work, and is often struggling to fairly balance the two out.

Walky-Worky


a working table, designed to distract its user from working

Walky-Worky


a working table, designed to distract its user from working
Walky-Worky is the God of discomfort, challenging its user to reconnect with its space of being.
File under
Type of project
  • New areas of operation

Public spaces provide full comfort and demand user’s dependency. Comfort is promoted as the quality of the space. It promises to transform spaces into safe spaces, of open-mindedness; but is that true? Commodified spaces cannot survive without users’ consumption of them. Think of educational institutions, clubs; supermarkets and cinemas are classic examples.

I don’t agree for spaces to be totally protective, or fostering needs to grow into dependent habits, where imagination shrinks. The user stops imagining when nothing in the space is missing. The user participates by confirming, and embodying the information as a new ideology to believe in.

The tradition of comfort lives on, and is passed onto generations to follow. Future makers are the messengers of that same comfort.

For discomfort to start competing with the dominant comfort found daily in spaces, the body should live it, before the same body proposes it as a tool for design. The design of discomfort is my proposal.



Walky-Worky


a working table, designed to distract its user from working

Walky-Worky


a working table, designed to distract its user from working
Walky-Worky is the God of discomfort, challenging its user to reconnect with its space of being.
File under
Type of project
  • New areas of operation

Public spaces provide full comfort and demand user’s dependency. Comfort is promoted as the quality of the space. It promises to transform spaces into safe spaces, of open-mindedness; but is that true? Commodified spaces cannot survive without users’ consumption of them. Think of educational institutions, clubs; supermarkets and cinemas are classic examples.

I don’t agree for spaces to be totally protective, or fostering needs to grow into dependent habits, where imagination shrinks. The user stops imagining when nothing in the space is missing. The user participates by confirming, and embodying the information as a new ideology to believe in.

The tradition of comfort lives on, and is passed onto generations to follow. Future makers are the messengers of that same comfort.

For discomfort to start competing with the dominant comfort found daily in spaces, the body should live it, before the same body proposes it as a tool for design. The design of discomfort is my proposal.




Idea by

Maisa Imamović
august vermeylenstraat 44
amsterdam
Netherlands
Maisa is a multi-doer. She is currently on her way to become a full-stack web-developer, with a degree in Architectural design. In between those two major occupations, her truest form of being is that of a writer. Of theory, and humans. She likes to work as much as not-work, and is often struggling to fairly balance the two out.