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Idea by

Martin B. Baraga

http://www.baraga.net

Rozna dolina cesta II/36, Ljubljana, Slovenia
Baraga is an artist and curator. His interactive works and audiovisual performances research the relation between man and machine, social aspects of contemporary culture, future monumentalism and political dimensions of today’s mediated realities. His large-scale installations are usually placed in public spaces and unusual architectural contexts. He often uses light and sound as means to create atmospheres that challenge our perceptions. He is the director of MoTA – Museum of Transitory Art.

Cyanometer


A Monument to the Blueness of the Sky

Cyanometer


A Monument to the Blueness of the Sky
A monument and a software that periodically collects images of the sky and displays air quality data.

The Cyanometer is a monument to the blueness of the sky. It is inspired by the original cyanometer, a measuring tool invented by Horace-Bénédict de Saussure. His cyanometer, a blue color wheel, forms the core of the monument, gently directing our gaze back to the sky. The monument is also a software that periodically collects images of the sky. It gathers data about the blueness of the sky and the quality of air. The Cyanometer displays the air pollution level on a color scale from green to red and points out the main pollutant in case of pollution.
The Cyanometer website is building a special online archive and retrospective calendar that joins images of the sky and air quality data and thus measures and documents changes to our environment.

Powered by solar panels, the Cyanometer is a self-sustaining organism that can be fully functional in any remote natural habitat, even in the most distant of areas such as the Alps.



The Cyanometer by Martin Bricelj Baraga is a monument to the blueness of the sky. It is inspired by the original cyanometer invented by Horace-Bénédict de Saussure. His cyanometer - a blue color wheel, forms the core of the monument, gently directing our gaze back to the sky.

The Cyanometer displays the air pollution level on a color scale from red to green and points out the main pollutant in case of pollution with a simple visualiser that anyone can read.

The first Cyanometer was located at Slovenska road, the main street of Ljubljana. It had been the busiest street in the city until recently, when it was transformed into a pedestrian zone with newly planted trees, envisioning a new city promenade. The Cyanometer was positioned at the beginning of the promenade with a view towards the Alps.

The Cyanometer's reflective surface underlines its monolithic shape and reflects its surroundings.

The Cyanometer periodically takes images of the sky and publishes them on the Cyanometer website together with air quality data, thus creating a special archive that measures changes to our environement.

Cyanometer


A Monument to the Blueness of the Sky

Cyanometer


A Monument to the Blueness of the Sky
A monument and a software that periodically collects images of the sky and displays air quality data.

The Cyanometer is a monument to the blueness of the sky. It is inspired by the original cyanometer, a measuring tool invented by Horace-Bénédict de Saussure. His cyanometer, a blue color wheel, forms the core of the monument, gently directing our gaze back to the sky. The monument is also a software that periodically collects images of the sky. It gathers data about the blueness of the sky and the quality of air. The Cyanometer displays the air pollution level on a color scale from green to red and points out the main pollutant in case of pollution.
The Cyanometer website is building a special online archive and retrospective calendar that joins images of the sky and air quality data and thus measures and documents changes to our environment.

Powered by solar panels, the Cyanometer is a self-sustaining organism that can be fully functional in any remote natural habitat, even in the most distant of areas such as the Alps.



The Cyanometer by Martin Bricelj Baraga is a monument to the blueness of the sky. It is inspired by the original cyanometer invented by Horace-Bénédict de Saussure. His cyanometer - a blue color wheel, forms the core of the monument, gently directing our gaze back to the sky.

The Cyanometer displays the air pollution level on a color scale from red to green and points out the main pollutant in case of pollution with a simple visualiser that anyone can read.

The first Cyanometer was located at Slovenska road, the main street of Ljubljana. It had been the busiest street in the city until recently, when it was transformed into a pedestrian zone with newly planted trees, envisioning a new city promenade. The Cyanometer was positioned at the beginning of the promenade with a view towards the Alps.

The Cyanometer's reflective surface underlines its monolithic shape and reflects its surroundings.

The Cyanometer periodically takes images of the sky and publishes them on the Cyanometer website together with air quality data, thus creating a special archive that measures changes to our environement.


Idea by

Martin B. Baraga
Rozna dolina cesta II/36
Ljubljana
Slovenia
Baraga is an artist and curator. His interactive works and audiovisual performances research the relation between man and machine, social aspects of contemporary culture, future monumentalism and political dimensions of today’s mediated realities. His large-scale installations are usually placed in public spaces and unusual architectural contexts. He often uses light and sound as means to create atmospheres that challenge our perceptions. He is the director of MoTA – Museum of Transitory Art.