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Idea by

Elif Çiğdem Artan, Eray Çaylı, Hayrettin Günç, Yelta Köm

Berlin, Germany
Çiğdem is a Berlin-based sociologist,museologist and curator,currently pursuing her doctoral research at TU-Berlin,Center for Metropolitan Studies,on archiving born materials.Eray is a London-based architectural anthropologist.He works at the Bartlett School of Architecture and the LSE.Hayrettin is a Boston-based architect and urban designer. He works as researcher at MIT Civic Data Design Lab and Team Better Block.Yelta is a Berlin-based architect and a graduate of the Staedelschule Frankfurt.

Inhabiting Precarity


Rethinking architecture in the age of precarity

Inhabiting Precarity


Rethinking architecture in the age of precarity
This project focuses on those who experience precarity as a permanent condition, and asks what sorts of spatial practices can emerge out of this experience.
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Precarity was once seen as a temporary transition between one mode of security and another. But fixed-term contracts, political instability, legal ambiguity and gentrification have become so ubiquitous today as to render precarity a permanent condition for ever-increasing populations. This project focuses on these populations, and asks what sorts of spatial practices can emerge out of their experience. It explores this question under the following four social fields that have each seen precarity’s becoming a ubiquitous condition: work (e.g., seasonal/migrant workers, call center employees), activism (e.g., squatters, Occupy protesters), law (e.g., asylum seekers, women’s shelter residents), and urbanism (victims of profit-led urban renewal). The age of precarity demands that architects stop offering “solutions” to individuals who experience precarity as such, and start documenting as legitimate works of architecture these individuals’ own material-spatial responses to this experience.

Inhabiting Precarity


Rethinking architecture in the age of precarity

Inhabiting Precarity


Rethinking architecture in the age of precarity
This project focuses on those who experience precarity as a permanent condition, and asks what sorts of spatial practices can emerge out of this experience.
File under

Precarity was once seen as a temporary transition between one mode of security and another. But fixed-term contracts, political instability, legal ambiguity and gentrification have become so ubiquitous today as to render precarity a permanent condition for ever-increasing populations. This project focuses on these populations, and asks what sorts of spatial practices can emerge out of their experience. It explores this question under the following four social fields that have each seen precarity’s becoming a ubiquitous condition: work (e.g., seasonal/migrant workers, call center employees), activism (e.g., squatters, Occupy protesters), law (e.g., asylum seekers, women’s shelter residents), and urbanism (victims of profit-led urban renewal). The age of precarity demands that architects stop offering “solutions” to individuals who experience precarity as such, and start documenting as legitimate works of architecture these individuals’ own material-spatial responses to this experience.


Idea by

Elif Çiğdem Artan, Eray Çaylı, Hayrettin Günç, Yelta Köm
Berlin
Germany
Çiğdem is a Berlin-based sociologist,museologist and curator,currently pursuing her doctoral research at TU-Berlin,Center for Metropolitan Studies,on archiving born materials.Eray is a London-based architectural anthropologist.He works at the Bartlett School of Architecture and the LSE.Hayrettin is a Boston-based architect and urban designer. He works as researcher at MIT Civic Data Design Lab and Team Better Block.Yelta is a Berlin-based architect and a graduate of the Staedelschule Frankfurt.