Search

Idea by

Matthew Ashton, Sofie Tolf

SP-ARC

http://www.sp-arc.se

Kristianstadsgatan 8, Malmö, Sweden
SP-ARC is an architectural collective based in Malmö founded by Matthew Ashton and Sofie Tolf in 2014. The practice has a strong interest in exploring the hidden edges of architecture, investigating sites of material production and extraction, the politics of speculative development and the large scale spatial consequences of our excessive consumption and production of real estate.

Political Geologies


Inhabiting the Anthropocene

Political Geologies


Inhabiting the Anthropocene
The possibility of another world lies hidden in the exhausted ruins of the present

'Political Geologies' aims to initiate a dialogue with the anthropocene through a series of territorial interventions and explorations across and upon the exhausted landscapes of extraction and exploitation which increasingly dot the periphery of our urban landscapes. Mines, quarries, gas fields, timber plantations, garbage tips and oil refineries - the 'sacrifice zones' which are required to maintain our current standards of living. These discarded territories should not be read solely as environmental victims of consumer capitalism, but could also be seen as possible sites of resistance. Detours around the shimmering accumulations of capital which currently constitute our cities and points of contact with the contested geologies below. A position from which we may be able to challenge neoliberal urbanism and its unwavering fidelity to the prolongation of the status quo and open up the possibility of once again imagining an alternative world.


Oil shale mine, Ida-Viru County, Estonia (Image: Google Maps)

Iron Ore Mine, Kiruna, Sweden (Image: Google Maps)

Nickel Mine, Zapolyarny, Murmansk Oblast, Russia (Image: Google Maps)

Iron ore mine, Bjørnevatn / Kirkenes, Norway (Image: Google Maps)

Limestone quarry, Pargas, Finland (Image: Google Maps)

Political Geologies


Inhabiting the Anthropocene

Political Geologies


Inhabiting the Anthropocene
The possibility of another world lies hidden in the exhausted ruins of the present

'Political Geologies' aims to initiate a dialogue with the anthropocene through a series of territorial interventions and explorations across and upon the exhausted landscapes of extraction and exploitation which increasingly dot the periphery of our urban landscapes. Mines, quarries, gas fields, timber plantations, garbage tips and oil refineries - the 'sacrifice zones' which are required to maintain our current standards of living. These discarded territories should not be read solely as environmental victims of consumer capitalism, but could also be seen as possible sites of resistance. Detours around the shimmering accumulations of capital which currently constitute our cities and points of contact with the contested geologies below. A position from which we may be able to challenge neoliberal urbanism and its unwavering fidelity to the prolongation of the status quo and open up the possibility of once again imagining an alternative world.


Oil shale mine, Ida-Viru County, Estonia (Image: Google Maps)

Iron Ore Mine, Kiruna, Sweden (Image: Google Maps)

Nickel Mine, Zapolyarny, Murmansk Oblast, Russia (Image: Google Maps)

Iron ore mine, Bjørnevatn / Kirkenes, Norway (Image: Google Maps)

Limestone quarry, Pargas, Finland (Image: Google Maps)


Idea by

Matthew Ashton, Sofie Tolf
SP-ARC
Kristianstadsgatan 8
Malmö
Sweden
SP-ARC is an architectural collective based in Malmö founded by Matthew Ashton and Sofie Tolf in 2014. The practice has a strong interest in exploring the hidden edges of architecture, investigating sites of material production and extraction, the politics of speculative development and the large scale spatial consequences of our excessive consumption and production of real estate.