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Idea by

Gaja Mežnarić Osole & Andrej Koruza

Janežičeva 5, Ljubljana, Slovenia
Gaja Mežnarić Osole is a Ljubljana based designer. After finishing masters in systemic design at Goldsmiths in London, she started working in cross-disciplinary fields between design, ecology and participation. Andrej Koruza (koruza.com) attended the Mosaic School of Friuli. His interdisciplinary practice consists of leading the production and wood workshop in a collective of designers, architects and craftsmen, producing various mosaic installations and creating intermedia installations.

Symbiocene


From fields of domination to fields of collaboration

Symbiocene


From fields of domination to fields of collaboration
Symbiocene is a project that aims to create a series of beehives from invasive plants, exploring interspecies relationships that constitute well-being of future cities

The project is a practical exploration of the complex interspecies dynamics in present urban ecosystems. It takes the problem of dominant invasive plants as a reflection of globalised capitalist economy. With their overruling natures, these monocultures displace native species and weaken the resilience of ecosystems.

It's time humans recognise the synergic interconnectedness among species as a necessity in sustaining desired conditions for life on Earth. Authors propose a series of urban beehives made from the wood of invasive trees as an invitation to a new era - symbiocene. Thus created synergies among human and more-than-human actors (bees, humans & invasive plants) can become a showcase for negotiating competitive relations into symbiotic. To overcome capitalist, anthropocentric perspectives on economy, urbanisation and nature, the beehives serve as a critical tool for questioning how and with whom to collaborate to build a diverse web of life and exchange in our future cities.


Perceiving economy as a way of organising nature

Deconstructing urbanisation

Mobilising surplus of nature’s hyperproduction

Activating spaces of interspecies learning

Symbiocene


From fields of domination to fields of collaboration

Symbiocene


From fields of domination to fields of collaboration
Symbiocene is a project that aims to create a series of beehives from invasive plants, exploring interspecies relationships that constitute well-being of future cities

The project is a practical exploration of the complex interspecies dynamics in present urban ecosystems. It takes the problem of dominant invasive plants as a reflection of globalised capitalist economy. With their overruling natures, these monocultures displace native species and weaken the resilience of ecosystems.

It's time humans recognise the synergic interconnectedness among species as a necessity in sustaining desired conditions for life on Earth. Authors propose a series of urban beehives made from the wood of invasive trees as an invitation to a new era - symbiocene. Thus created synergies among human and more-than-human actors (bees, humans & invasive plants) can become a showcase for negotiating competitive relations into symbiotic. To overcome capitalist, anthropocentric perspectives on economy, urbanisation and nature, the beehives serve as a critical tool for questioning how and with whom to collaborate to build a diverse web of life and exchange in our future cities.


Perceiving economy as a way of organising nature

Deconstructing urbanisation

Mobilising surplus of nature’s hyperproduction

Activating spaces of interspecies learning


Idea by

Gaja Mežnarić Osole & Andrej Koruza
Janežičeva 5
Ljubljana
Slovenia
Gaja Mežnarić Osole is a Ljubljana based designer. After finishing masters in systemic design at Goldsmiths in London, she started working in cross-disciplinary fields between design, ecology and participation. Andrej Koruza (koruza.com) attended the Mosaic School of Friuli. His interdisciplinary practice consists of leading the production and wood workshop in a collective of designers, architects and craftsmen, producing various mosaic installations and creating intermedia installations.