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Idea by

Diana Cristobal Olave, Maria Esnaola Cano, Alicia Hernanz Perez, Gonzalo J Lopez Garrido, Alfonso Simelio Jurado and Tania Oramas Dorta.

Knitknot architecture

http://www.knitknotarchitecture.com

231 Bowery 2nd Fl, New York, United States of America
Knitknot architecture is an international collective based in New York, Los Angeles, London and Paris. Founded in 2013, it is an award winning collective that combines practice with academia. Knitknot members have conducted research at GSAPP, Pratt, Princeton, USC, Bartlett and Akademie der Künste. Their work has been published in magazines such as AVProyectos, Revista PLOT, MONU. Its members are Diana Cristobal, Maria Esnaola, Alicia Hernanz, Gonzalo J Lopez, Alfonso Simelio and Tania Oramas.

The Millennials’ Suburbia


Suburban Domestic Dreams in the Age of Precarity.

The Millennials’ Suburbia


Suburban Domestic Dreams in the Age of Precarity.
Rethinking the collective imaginary of suburban areas after the enforced millennial urban exodus.
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Type of project
  • Systemic changes

Since 1945, the suburbs have been a contested site of struggle within architecture debates. What once was a typology for returning veterans that reinforced racial segregation and conjured visions of traditional family life and idyllic domesticity, also became the site for counter-normative design experiments. Nowadays, almost 50 years after Scott Brown and Venturi’s controversial studio “Learning from Levittown,” the suburbs are again in the forefront of architectural debates—albeit for a very different reason. In the United States, the housing bubble is radically shifting the domestic dreams of the millennial generation, and redirecting them again to the suburbia. In Europe, the suburbs reproduce the serious challenges that European integration face nowadays: from the refugee and migrant crisis to youth unemployment. This project looks at the spatial outcomes of these systemic economic and social changes, reimagining a new form of collectivity that emerges out of economic necessity.


The Millennials’ Suburbia


Suburban Domestic Dreams in the Age of Precarity.

The Millennials’ Suburbia


Suburban Domestic Dreams in the Age of Precarity.
Rethinking the collective imaginary of suburban areas after the enforced millennial urban exodus.
File under
Type of project
  • Systemic changes

Since 1945, the suburbs have been a contested site of struggle within architecture debates. What once was a typology for returning veterans that reinforced racial segregation and conjured visions of traditional family life and idyllic domesticity, also became the site for counter-normative design experiments. Nowadays, almost 50 years after Scott Brown and Venturi’s controversial studio “Learning from Levittown,” the suburbs are again in the forefront of architectural debates—albeit for a very different reason. In the United States, the housing bubble is radically shifting the domestic dreams of the millennial generation, and redirecting them again to the suburbia. In Europe, the suburbs reproduce the serious challenges that European integration face nowadays: from the refugee and migrant crisis to youth unemployment. This project looks at the spatial outcomes of these systemic economic and social changes, reimagining a new form of collectivity that emerges out of economic necessity.



Idea by

Diana Cristobal Olave, Maria Esnaola Cano, Alicia Hernanz Perez, Gonzalo J Lopez Garrido, Alfonso Simelio Jurado and Tania Oramas Dorta.
Knitknot architecture
231 Bowery 2nd Fl
New York
United States of America
Knitknot architecture is an international collective based in New York, Los Angeles, London and Paris. Founded in 2013, it is an award winning collective that combines practice with academia. Knitknot members have conducted research at GSAPP, Pratt, Princeton, USC, Bartlett and Akademie der Künste. Their work has been published in magazines such as AVProyectos, Revista PLOT, MONU. Its members are Diana Cristobal, Maria Esnaola, Alicia Hernanz, Gonzalo J Lopez, Alfonso Simelio and Tania Oramas.