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Idea by

Emmanuelle Chiappone-Piriou

12, rue royale, Orléans, France
An architect, historian and curator, E. Chiappone-Piriou questions the architectural field as one that stands “at the edge of everything else” (Choi, Trotter), a body contaminated by images, ideas and procedures from the artistic, political and scientific fields. At the Frac Centre, she has curated “Relief(s)” and was assistant curator of the 9th ArchiLab. She has collaborated on exhibitions and catalogs, at the Centre Pompidou and OMA/AMO, and has written about the architecture exhibition.

Black Swans


Effective uncertainties

Black Swans


Effective uncertainties
Look around: there are as many possible futures as there are designers, all valid. Although the idea of future was declared dead in 1969, how can today’s architecture still question it, through open procedures that enable rather than impose and determine?

The 20th Century positivistic belief in progress is long-gone, and with it the prescriptive models offered by avant-garde, modernity, and post WW2 “prospective and futurologic” projects (Ragon). Today, only private companies still exploit the idea of future and, as Cisco, propose to “bring the future to life” in neo-cybernetic urban totalities. How can architecture still invent, in a time when the notion of prediction is at the heart of our “algorithmic governmentality”, ruling the financial and socio-political fields? By bridging historic experiences of auto-construction and prefabrication with today’s crowd-sourcing and combinatorial logics, coupled with additive and robotic fabrication, designers may explore the potential of indeterminacy. They can develop tools, methods and critical apparatuses that enable rather than predict and allow for unexpected novelty (an architectural black swan); systems opened to hyper-local customization may thus reinstitute decision over prescription.


Pascal Haüsermann, Domobiles, 1971

Plethora project (Jose Sanchez), Polyomino, 2014 (c)Plethora project

David Georges Emmerich, Agglomération (sous une coupole stéréométrique), 1958-1960, Collection Frac Centre-Val de Loire

EZCT, Studies in Recursive Lattices, 2013 (c)EZCT

Black Swans


Effective uncertainties

Black Swans


Effective uncertainties
Look around: there are as many possible futures as there are designers, all valid. Although the idea of future was declared dead in 1969, how can today’s architecture still question it, through open procedures that enable rather than impose and determine?

The 20th Century positivistic belief in progress is long-gone, and with it the prescriptive models offered by avant-garde, modernity, and post WW2 “prospective and futurologic” projects (Ragon). Today, only private companies still exploit the idea of future and, as Cisco, propose to “bring the future to life” in neo-cybernetic urban totalities. How can architecture still invent, in a time when the notion of prediction is at the heart of our “algorithmic governmentality”, ruling the financial and socio-political fields? By bridging historic experiences of auto-construction and prefabrication with today’s crowd-sourcing and combinatorial logics, coupled with additive and robotic fabrication, designers may explore the potential of indeterminacy. They can develop tools, methods and critical apparatuses that enable rather than predict and allow for unexpected novelty (an architectural black swan); systems opened to hyper-local customization may thus reinstitute decision over prescription.


Pascal Haüsermann, Domobiles, 1971

Plethora project (Jose Sanchez), Polyomino, 2014 (c)Plethora project

David Georges Emmerich, Agglomération (sous une coupole stéréométrique), 1958-1960, Collection Frac Centre-Val de Loire

EZCT, Studies in Recursive Lattices, 2013 (c)EZCT


Idea by

Emmanuelle Chiappone-Piriou
12, rue royale
Orléans
France
An architect, historian and curator, E. Chiappone-Piriou questions the architectural field as one that stands “at the edge of everything else” (Choi, Trotter), a body contaminated by images, ideas and procedures from the artistic, political and scientific fields. At the Frac Centre, she has curated “Relief(s)” and was assistant curator of the 9th ArchiLab. She has collaborated on exhibitions and catalogs, at the Centre Pompidou and OMA/AMO, and has written about the architecture exhibition.