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Idea by

James Hamilton + Malin Heyman

AT - HH

http://www.at-hh.com

Osquars backe 9, Stockholm, Sweden
James Hamilton and Malin Heyman are both graduates of the Cooper Union School of Architecture. They live in Stockholm, where their practice attempts to engage writing, teaching, exhibitions and construction. They direct a first year studio at the KTH School of Architecture and have been invited guest critics at Cooper Union, NYU, RISD and the AHO in Oslo. They have taken part in and organized exhibitions in New York, Stockholm and Venice and have presented their work at The New Museum.

Migratory Tectonics


movements and transformations of fragments, elements and things

Migratory Tectonics


movements and transformations of fragments, elements and things
The project Migratory Tectonics proposes a series of ideal structures that develop and interrogate fundamental relationships between human / non-human agents and the structures they effect and are effected by.

Tectonic elements, a character and three things the character carries with them are explored as they migrate between a series of three progressively more and more prototypically urban conditions of inhabitation - flat ground, two parallel vertical bearing walls and a uniform structural grid - essentially developing a set of migratory tectonics.

At a fundamental level the projoect encourages the re-interpretation and re-use of methods and tectonic elements, the investigation of program and it’s specifics, and an understanding of the implicit potential of prototypical structural conditions in the development of a series of singular architectonic proposals.

The project aims to address issues such as: things as defined by Bruno Latour and the perceived effects of “matters of concern” as opposed to “matters of fact” established through a re-framing of design practices, gender and the embodiment of non-normal points.


element : the pavillion

*in collaboration with Birkir Ingibjartsson

room : the lobby

fragment : corner

element : bus stop

room : the assembly

Migratory Tectonics


movements and transformations of fragments, elements and things

Migratory Tectonics


movements and transformations of fragments, elements and things
The project Migratory Tectonics proposes a series of ideal structures that develop and interrogate fundamental relationships between human / non-human agents and the structures they effect and are effected by.

Tectonic elements, a character and three things the character carries with them are explored as they migrate between a series of three progressively more and more prototypically urban conditions of inhabitation - flat ground, two parallel vertical bearing walls and a uniform structural grid - essentially developing a set of migratory tectonics.

At a fundamental level the projoect encourages the re-interpretation and re-use of methods and tectonic elements, the investigation of program and it’s specifics, and an understanding of the implicit potential of prototypical structural conditions in the development of a series of singular architectonic proposals.

The project aims to address issues such as: things as defined by Bruno Latour and the perceived effects of “matters of concern” as opposed to “matters of fact” established through a re-framing of design practices, gender and the embodiment of non-normal points.


element : the pavillion

*in collaboration with Birkir Ingibjartsson

room : the lobby

fragment : corner

element : bus stop

room : the assembly


Idea by

James Hamilton + Malin Heyman
AT - HH
Osquars backe 9
Stockholm
Sweden
James Hamilton and Malin Heyman are both graduates of the Cooper Union School of Architecture. They live in Stockholm, where their practice attempts to engage writing, teaching, exhibitions and construction. They direct a first year studio at the KTH School of Architecture and have been invited guest critics at Cooper Union, NYU, RISD and the AHO in Oslo. They have taken part in and organized exhibitions in New York, Stockholm and Venice and have presented their work at The New Museum.