Search

Idea by

Isabelle Daëron

Studio Idaë

http://www.studioidae.com

20 rue Primo Levi, 75013 Paris, France
Designer and research designer, graduated from ENSCI-Les Ateliers and Esad in Reims, Isabelle Daëron designs scenarios connecting natural ressources and habitability. Her projects put into perspective the importance of environmental issues and their scope of application (flows, mobility, public space). Studio Idaë operates in three main areas of activity acting in synergy: urban design, set design, and research.

Aero-Seine


A cooling point for public spaces

Aero-Seine


A cooling point for public spaces
Using the non-drinkable water network in Paris in order to cool the public space
File under
Type of project
  • Site-specific cases

Dense cities, with many impervious surfaces, and non vegetated, will be more and more faced with the heat island effect.
In Paris, for instance, the daily average temperatures are already around 2 to 3 degrees Celsius higher than the rest of the region.
This could reach up to 10°C in the summer in the next few years…
Therefore we could use grey waters, non-drinkable waters to cool the air in cities.
For example, by the 19th century, Paris had set up a network for non-drinkable water to be used for watering public gardens and cleaning the streets. This system draws water from the main river, Seine. The water then goes to three water plants where it is just filtered no treated chemically. What is interesting with this water system is that it enables to provide a cheaper and less energy consuming than drinkable water.
From this context, we designed a cooling point for public spaces that cools the ambient air thanks to evaporation of water on a porous material.


Aero-Seine, Blanchard Street, Paris 20e, France. Photo credits: Pierre L'excellent / Pavillon de l'Arsenal

Aero-Seine, detail, Blanchard Street, Paris 20e, France. Photo credits: Pierre L'excellent / Pavillon de l'Arsenal

Aero-Seine, detail, Blanchard Street, Paris 20e, France. Photo credits: Pierre L'excellent / Pavillon de l'Arsenal

Aero-Seine, how it works.

Temperature measure in Blanchard Street, Paris 20e, France.

Aero-Seine


A cooling point for public spaces

Aero-Seine


A cooling point for public spaces
Using the non-drinkable water network in Paris in order to cool the public space
File under
Type of project
  • Site-specific cases

Dense cities, with many impervious surfaces, and non vegetated, will be more and more faced with the heat island effect.
In Paris, for instance, the daily average temperatures are already around 2 to 3 degrees Celsius higher than the rest of the region.
This could reach up to 10°C in the summer in the next few years…
Therefore we could use grey waters, non-drinkable waters to cool the air in cities.
For example, by the 19th century, Paris had set up a network for non-drinkable water to be used for watering public gardens and cleaning the streets. This system draws water from the main river, Seine. The water then goes to three water plants where it is just filtered no treated chemically. What is interesting with this water system is that it enables to provide a cheaper and less energy consuming than drinkable water.
From this context, we designed a cooling point for public spaces that cools the ambient air thanks to evaporation of water on a porous material.


Aero-Seine, Blanchard Street, Paris 20e, France. Photo credits: Pierre L'excellent / Pavillon de l'Arsenal

Aero-Seine, detail, Blanchard Street, Paris 20e, France. Photo credits: Pierre L'excellent / Pavillon de l'Arsenal

Aero-Seine, detail, Blanchard Street, Paris 20e, France. Photo credits: Pierre L'excellent / Pavillon de l'Arsenal

Aero-Seine, how it works.

Temperature measure in Blanchard Street, Paris 20e, France.


Idea by

Isabelle Daëron
Studio Idaë
20 rue Primo Levi
75013 Paris
France
Designer and research designer, graduated from ENSCI-Les Ateliers and Esad in Reims, Isabelle Daëron designs scenarios connecting natural ressources and habitability. Her projects put into perspective the importance of environmental issues and their scope of application (flows, mobility, public space). Studio Idaë operates in three main areas of activity acting in synergy: urban design, set design, and research.