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Idea by

Erin Besler, Ian Besler

Besler & Sons

http://www.erinbesler.com

Los Angeles, United States of America
Besler & Sons is a Los Angeles based practice that works across multiple sites of production. They work through references to reuse things that are already in circulation—things that they find interesting—and refit them into a slightly different framework through models, mockups, media, and software. Sometimes those references are really clear in their work, sometimes they’re not. Erin Besler was born in Chicago. She is faculty at UCLA.. Ian Besler was born in Chicago. He is a lecturer at USC.

The Fit Out


Making Architectural Waste Fit for Use

The Fit Out


Making Architectural Waste Fit for Use
Problems of waste and reuse in architecture are relegated to practice. We can make them fit elsewhere.

Everything in architecture is a variation of something that has come before; something that is already in circulation; replicated, reused, reiterated re_ anything really. In disciplinary conversations, these concern repurposing of architectural ideas. In conversations regarding the practice of architecture, these terms address physical materials. We incentivize repetition with platinum, gold and silver stars. Architecture’s use of these terms is split. The divide reflects broader divisions in the field.

This proposal makes productive all phases of the design, construction, use, and demolition process using the following procedures: (1) Make fit for use – recuperating a material object to be used again. (2) Make fit into – making existing material objects fit into others. (3) Make fit within – actively rethinking ideas about use to reprogram and reschedule space for various occupations. By rehabilitating this split, this proposal seeks to introduce new forms of fitness to the field.



Squiggle Vimeo Video Above produced by Satoru Sugihara/ATLV
Website and Software - Besler & Sons and Satoru Sugihara/ATLV
www.studfindr.org

The conceptual framework for these retrofits is “zero waste” where neither ideas, materials, nor energy are discarded but all “made fit.”

Many of the operations that produce architectural construction waste are not inevitable but rather derive specifically from the misfit between disciplinary interests and practice exigencies. Because construction and demolition waste are the largest cause of our waste crisis but currently thought of as a problem relegated to building rather than architecture, the opportunity to rethink waste has been wasted.

Because construction and demolition waste are the largest cause of our waste crisis but currently thought of as a problem relegated to building rather than architecture, the opportunity to rethink waste has been wasted.

The Fit Out


Making Architectural Waste Fit for Use

The Fit Out


Making Architectural Waste Fit for Use
Problems of waste and reuse in architecture are relegated to practice. We can make them fit elsewhere.

Everything in architecture is a variation of something that has come before; something that is already in circulation; replicated, reused, reiterated re_ anything really. In disciplinary conversations, these concern repurposing of architectural ideas. In conversations regarding the practice of architecture, these terms address physical materials. We incentivize repetition with platinum, gold and silver stars. Architecture’s use of these terms is split. The divide reflects broader divisions in the field.

This proposal makes productive all phases of the design, construction, use, and demolition process using the following procedures: (1) Make fit for use – recuperating a material object to be used again. (2) Make fit into – making existing material objects fit into others. (3) Make fit within – actively rethinking ideas about use to reprogram and reschedule space for various occupations. By rehabilitating this split, this proposal seeks to introduce new forms of fitness to the field.



Squiggle Vimeo Video Above produced by Satoru Sugihara/ATLV
Website and Software - Besler & Sons and Satoru Sugihara/ATLV
www.studfindr.org

The conceptual framework for these retrofits is “zero waste” where neither ideas, materials, nor energy are discarded but all “made fit.”

Many of the operations that produce architectural construction waste are not inevitable but rather derive specifically from the misfit between disciplinary interests and practice exigencies. Because construction and demolition waste are the largest cause of our waste crisis but currently thought of as a problem relegated to building rather than architecture, the opportunity to rethink waste has been wasted.

Because construction and demolition waste are the largest cause of our waste crisis but currently thought of as a problem relegated to building rather than architecture, the opportunity to rethink waste has been wasted.


Idea by

Erin Besler, Ian Besler
Besler & Sons
Los Angeles
United States of America
Besler & Sons is a Los Angeles based practice that works across multiple sites of production. They work through references to reuse things that are already in circulation—things that they find interesting—and refit them into a slightly different framework through models, mockups, media, and software. Sometimes those references are really clear in their work, sometimes they’re not. Erin Besler was born in Chicago. She is faculty at UCLA.. Ian Besler was born in Chicago. He is a lecturer at USC.