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Idea by

Camille Filbien, Benjamin Wells, Francis Naydler, Jacob Sturdy

Medium

https://medium.works

Philip De Langes Allé, Copenhagen, Denmark
Medium is formed of four architects who have collaborated since their studies in Political Architecture at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts (KADK) in Copenhagen. Medium developed a dual research and design project for the inaugural Tbilisi Architecture Biennial, exploring themes of ownership and spatial commons in both Tbilisi and Copenhagen. Medium's contribution to the Biennial takes the form of a two-phase built installation in the Soviet microdistrict of Gldani - 8-23-VI.

8-23-VI


Questioning the public-private binary

8-23-VI


Questioning the public-private binary
An adaptable architecture that mediates between public and private territories
File under
Type of project
  • Site-specific cases

8-23-VI prototypes an architecture that questions public-private binaries, redefining their relation as ambiguous and fluid. Commissioned as part of a collaboration with the Tbilisi Architecture Biennial, 8-23-VI uses the temporal format of the biennial to catalyse a permanent and public pavilion for the residents of entrance VI, Block 23, in the 8th district of Gldani - a Soviet-built housing district in Tbilisi, Georgia.

8-23-VI extends the threshold between Block 23’s semi-private circulation space and the surrounding public realm, reactivating it as a common ground for collective use. A continuous surface of rotating panels allows the pavilion to be transformed from a private room - an extension of the block’s domestic spaces - to a more open and negotiable public territory. 8-23-VI is attuned to its specific site, but looks towards an architectural strategy that holds a wider relevance - by contesting norms of ownership and individuality in favour of commonality.


8-23-VI connects the semi-private circulation space of Block 23 with the surrounding public realm, extending and activating the threshold between them. Photographs - Benjamin Wells

In the context of Gldani’s planned but since neglected public realm, the project re-activates this space as a common ground for collective use. Photographs - Benjamin Wells

A continuous surface of rotating panels allows the pavilion to transform between a private room - an extension of the block’s domestic spaces - and a more open and fragmented threshold. Photographs - Benjamin Wells

The pavilion’s folding walls redefine the relationship between public-private as ambiguous and ever-changing. Photographs - Angus Leadley Brown (L) / Benjamin Wells (R)

8-23-VI establishes a new common ground for the residents of Block 23, with an architectural medium that embraces transformation and collective use. Photographs - Benjamin Wells

8-23-VI


Questioning the public-private binary

8-23-VI


Questioning the public-private binary
An adaptable architecture that mediates between public and private territories
File under
Type of project
  • Site-specific cases

8-23-VI prototypes an architecture that questions public-private binaries, redefining their relation as ambiguous and fluid. Commissioned as part of a collaboration with the Tbilisi Architecture Biennial, 8-23-VI uses the temporal format of the biennial to catalyse a permanent and public pavilion for the residents of entrance VI, Block 23, in the 8th district of Gldani - a Soviet-built housing district in Tbilisi, Georgia.

8-23-VI extends the threshold between Block 23’s semi-private circulation space and the surrounding public realm, reactivating it as a common ground for collective use. A continuous surface of rotating panels allows the pavilion to be transformed from a private room - an extension of the block’s domestic spaces - to a more open and negotiable public territory. 8-23-VI is attuned to its specific site, but looks towards an architectural strategy that holds a wider relevance - by contesting norms of ownership and individuality in favour of commonality.


8-23-VI connects the semi-private circulation space of Block 23 with the surrounding public realm, extending and activating the threshold between them. Photographs - Benjamin Wells

In the context of Gldani’s planned but since neglected public realm, the project re-activates this space as a common ground for collective use. Photographs - Benjamin Wells

A continuous surface of rotating panels allows the pavilion to transform between a private room - an extension of the block’s domestic spaces - and a more open and fragmented threshold. Photographs - Benjamin Wells

The pavilion’s folding walls redefine the relationship between public-private as ambiguous and ever-changing. Photographs - Angus Leadley Brown (L) / Benjamin Wells (R)

8-23-VI establishes a new common ground for the residents of Block 23, with an architectural medium that embraces transformation and collective use. Photographs - Benjamin Wells


Idea by

Camille Filbien, Benjamin Wells, Francis Naydler, Jacob Sturdy
Medium
Philip De Langes Allé
Copenhagen
Denmark
Medium is formed of four architects who have collaborated since their studies in Political Architecture at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts (KADK) in Copenhagen. Medium developed a dual research and design project for the inaugural Tbilisi Architecture Biennial, exploring themes of ownership and spatial commons in both Tbilisi and Copenhagen. Medium's contribution to the Biennial takes the form of a two-phase built installation in the Soviet microdistrict of Gldani - 8-23-VI.