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Idea by

Lee Wakeling

Western Parade, Portsmouth, United Kingdom
Since the commencement of my studies at the University of Portsmouth, I have grappled with various projects with ambitions of helping to 'save the planet'. Now in my final year of the Master of Architecture course, I am able to focus this passion into self-directed schemes. Once I have graduated, I plan on absorbing the rich history, culture and architecture of many destinations around the globe so that it may influence my future works.

Industrial Sunrise


Tackling the Invisible Enemy

Industrial Sunrise


Tackling the Invisible Enemy
Spaces that utilise dockyards of a diminishing global naval fleet

Ships are the invisible polluter. By 2020 they will be the biggest polluter in the EU surpassing all land-based emissions. By utilising the dockyards of a diminishing global naval fleet, we can build retrofitting facilities that can cut 80-90% of air pollution from ships, with supplementary research centres enabling a low carbon future for shipping. Architects will need to respond to these vital technologies, when we migrate to a low carbon economy that doesn't just concern the construction of buildings, but maritime industries too. Beyond this, we can deal with the horrific conditions suffered in the dismantling of ships and propose ways that their materials can be taken safely, and subsequently used in construction projects. Collaboration between sectors is of paramount importance in ensuring that we can tackle these issues effectively, so that in the future it will be possible to look back and consider the idea as a pioneering step towards combating climate change at a global level.


Serious issues that the shipping industry is currently facing.

Possible retrofitting options that can be implemented by various vessels.

Holistic overview of a retrofitting facility and research centre, set within Portsmouth's Naval Base.

Components from ships can be tested in the Research Centre.

A high quality building will create a positive impression at strategic nodal points.

Industrial Sunrise


Tackling the Invisible Enemy

Industrial Sunrise


Tackling the Invisible Enemy
Spaces that utilise dockyards of a diminishing global naval fleet

Ships are the invisible polluter. By 2020 they will be the biggest polluter in the EU surpassing all land-based emissions. By utilising the dockyards of a diminishing global naval fleet, we can build retrofitting facilities that can cut 80-90% of air pollution from ships, with supplementary research centres enabling a low carbon future for shipping. Architects will need to respond to these vital technologies, when we migrate to a low carbon economy that doesn't just concern the construction of buildings, but maritime industries too. Beyond this, we can deal with the horrific conditions suffered in the dismantling of ships and propose ways that their materials can be taken safely, and subsequently used in construction projects. Collaboration between sectors is of paramount importance in ensuring that we can tackle these issues effectively, so that in the future it will be possible to look back and consider the idea as a pioneering step towards combating climate change at a global level.


Serious issues that the shipping industry is currently facing.

Possible retrofitting options that can be implemented by various vessels.

Holistic overview of a retrofitting facility and research centre, set within Portsmouth's Naval Base.

Components from ships can be tested in the Research Centre.

A high quality building will create a positive impression at strategic nodal points.


Idea by

Lee Wakeling
Western Parade
Portsmouth
United Kingdom
Since the commencement of my studies at the University of Portsmouth, I have grappled with various projects with ambitions of helping to 'save the planet'. Now in my final year of the Master of Architecture course, I am able to focus this passion into self-directed schemes. Once I have graduated, I plan on absorbing the rich history, culture and architecture of many destinations around the globe so that it may influence my future works.