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Idea by

Hermione Spriggs

Hermione Spriggs

http://hermione-spriggs.com/

20 Portland St, York, United Kingdom
Whether sharing her bedroom with the instar cycle of Luna moths, or undergoing hypnosis to enhance her sense of smell, Hermione’s work as an artist and writer explores experience from the perspective of other species. Informed by ethnographic fieldwork with fox trappers in urban and rural England, Spriggs' approach to landscape and environment borrows from the ritual/sensory/sculptural techniques of hunters and trap-setters who mediate between the worlds of human and animal.

What is it like to be a trap?


Art for other animals

What is it like to be a trap?


Art for other animals
The temporary fusion of human and non-human to accomplish collective action.

THE TRAP

As a device to catch prey, a snare is useless in isolation. The trap reconfigures its own context to suit a desired outcome. However, the surrounding environment is only one factor among many constituting a trap, embodied in both its material form and local situation. Anthropologist Alfred Gell describes the trap as a container for human agency and a nexus of interspecies relationships, an “evocation of complex intentionalities” that shifts from the symbolic to the operational: a “representation that functions as a prosthesis”.
As a processual assemblage, the trap ought be further explored as a model for discovering trans-species contact and, more generally, for developing empathy with the other, especially beyond the familiar context of predator-prey. The trap allows for multiple natures of intelligence to function alongside each other and exemplifies the temporary fusion of human and non-human to accomplish collective action.


Cage trap (London), illustration Hermione Spriggs

Garden Trapset (London), illustration Hermione Spriggs

Snare Trapset (Northumberland), illustration Hermione Spriggs

Snare (Camouflaged), illustration Hermione Spriggs

Trap Trapper Trapp't, illustration Hermione Spriggs

What is it like to be a trap?


Art for other animals

What is it like to be a trap?


Art for other animals
The temporary fusion of human and non-human to accomplish collective action.

THE TRAP

As a device to catch prey, a snare is useless in isolation. The trap reconfigures its own context to suit a desired outcome. However, the surrounding environment is only one factor among many constituting a trap, embodied in both its material form and local situation. Anthropologist Alfred Gell describes the trap as a container for human agency and a nexus of interspecies relationships, an “evocation of complex intentionalities” that shifts from the symbolic to the operational: a “representation that functions as a prosthesis”.
As a processual assemblage, the trap ought be further explored as a model for discovering trans-species contact and, more generally, for developing empathy with the other, especially beyond the familiar context of predator-prey. The trap allows for multiple natures of intelligence to function alongside each other and exemplifies the temporary fusion of human and non-human to accomplish collective action.


Cage trap (London), illustration Hermione Spriggs

Garden Trapset (London), illustration Hermione Spriggs

Snare Trapset (Northumberland), illustration Hermione Spriggs

Snare (Camouflaged), illustration Hermione Spriggs

Trap Trapper Trapp't, illustration Hermione Spriggs


Idea by

Hermione Spriggs
Hermione Spriggs
20 Portland St
York
United Kingdom
Whether sharing her bedroom with the instar cycle of Luna moths, or undergoing hypnosis to enhance her sense of smell, Hermione’s work as an artist and writer explores experience from the perspective of other species. Informed by ethnographic fieldwork with fox trappers in urban and rural England, Spriggs' approach to landscape and environment borrows from the ritual/sensory/sculptural techniques of hunters and trap-setters who mediate between the worlds of human and animal.