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Idea by

Matthew Stewart (with Jane Chew)

114 Bakersfield, Crayford Road, London, United Kingdom
Matthew is a researcher and designer based in London interested in the spatial manifestations of our unfolding data driven economy. His work attempts to document both the abstract and everyday spaces defined through data technologies, explored through writing, installations, exhibitions, and design residencies. Matthew is a contributor to the online research platform Failed Architecture and teaches architecture at the University of Westminster.

Institute of Patent Infringement


Institute of Patent Infringement


To document how ‘Big Tech’ firms are increasingly turning to physical space to define the future of automation while creating a framework where architects, and other practitioners, can challenge this process.
File under
Type of project
  • New areas of operation

With the rise of digital platforms the future is today defined through a monopoly of companies; a legally sanctioned system closed off through intellectual property. Taking Amazon as a leading example, the project comprised research into the many patents filed by Amazon in some way related to automation, the body and space.These patents were organised and made available online before an open call was launched asking for proposals to reimagine them. The results were displayed in the Dutch Pavillion and subsequently took the form of a roaming patent library installation shown in the V&A and Het Nieuwe Instituut in Rotterdam.The project provides a means to visually represent and document often abstract information related to current unfolding questions surrounding automation that will impact the future of architecture. Secondly, it allowed professionals to redefine what our automated futures might look like or to critically reflect on this process taking place.


Commissioned by Het Nieuwe Instituut for the Dutch Pavillion the project firstly involved research into the thousands of patents Amazon had filed related to automation, the body and space. These patents were made available online on a website.

An open call was launched in which 70 entries were received with 13 selected to be displayed. This entry by Gruppo Torto looked at creating from Amazon's patents a search and rescue facility to rescue migrants in the Meditarean sea.

Institute of Patent Infringement's display in the Dutch Pavillion at the Venice Architecture Biennale

Institute of Patent Infringement installation as a hackable patent library at the V&A as part of LDF in collaboration with curator Brendan Cormier and graphic designer Jules Esteves.

Institute of Patent Infringement installation as a hackable patent library at Het Nieuwe Instituut

Institute of Patent Infringement


Institute of Patent Infringement


To document how ‘Big Tech’ firms are increasingly turning to physical space to define the future of automation while creating a framework where architects, and other practitioners, can challenge this process.
File under
Type of project
  • New areas of operation

With the rise of digital platforms the future is today defined through a monopoly of companies; a legally sanctioned system closed off through intellectual property. Taking Amazon as a leading example, the project comprised research into the many patents filed by Amazon in some way related to automation, the body and space.These patents were organised and made available online before an open call was launched asking for proposals to reimagine them. The results were displayed in the Dutch Pavillion and subsequently took the form of a roaming patent library installation shown in the V&A and Het Nieuwe Instituut in Rotterdam.The project provides a means to visually represent and document often abstract information related to current unfolding questions surrounding automation that will impact the future of architecture. Secondly, it allowed professionals to redefine what our automated futures might look like or to critically reflect on this process taking place.


Commissioned by Het Nieuwe Instituut for the Dutch Pavillion the project firstly involved research into the thousands of patents Amazon had filed related to automation, the body and space. These patents were made available online on a website.

An open call was launched in which 70 entries were received with 13 selected to be displayed. This entry by Gruppo Torto looked at creating from Amazon's patents a search and rescue facility to rescue migrants in the Meditarean sea.

Institute of Patent Infringement's display in the Dutch Pavillion at the Venice Architecture Biennale

Institute of Patent Infringement installation as a hackable patent library at the V&A as part of LDF in collaboration with curator Brendan Cormier and graphic designer Jules Esteves.

Institute of Patent Infringement installation as a hackable patent library at Het Nieuwe Instituut


Idea by

Matthew Stewart (with Jane Chew)
114 Bakersfield, Crayford Road
London
United Kingdom
Matthew is a researcher and designer based in London interested in the spatial manifestations of our unfolding data driven economy. His work attempts to document both the abstract and everyday spaces defined through data technologies, explored through writing, installations, exhibitions, and design residencies. Matthew is a contributor to the online research platform Failed Architecture and teaches architecture at the University of Westminster.