Search

Idea by

David Habets

Stromarkt 3, Amsterdam, Netherlands
David Habets has a background in applied physics and (landscape) architecture at the University Eindhoven and Academy of Architecture Amsterdam (NL). He worked as a freelance researcher and architect at TNO and the AMC. In addition to this David has been intensively involved at RAAAF from 2011 – present [Deltawerk // – Breaking Habits – Trusted Strangers]. Combining professional fields David is interested in the embodiment of our thoughts, work and habits in our landscapes.

Brave New Substrate


a new substate for an old mine

Brave New Substrate


a new substate for an old mine
Brave New Substrate questions the role of architecture in our biochemical future. Knowledge development is made perceivable by radical new forms-of-life; extremophiles growing on the industrial heritage on a functioning industrial site.
File under
Type of project
  • New areas of operation

Brave New Substrate – is a research-by-design project investigating the biochemical future of the functioning industrial area ‘De Maurits’ in the South of the Netherlands. Over the course of history, the coal mine has transformed into a petrochemical complex that is now on the eve of the ‘biotech revolution’. In what ways can architecture contribute to the development of radical new industries at the beginning of our ‘biochemical’ anthropocene?

Exploring three landscape-experiments; a sulphate warehouse, abandoned mine shafts and the functioning cooling tower as substrates to new biochemical experiments. Hot water from the cooling tower, polluted water from the mine shafts and plastic mountains in the sulphate warehouse will form a new habitat for the isolated microbal life. Industrial heritage and knowledge development will be made perceivable in a radical new way, by fostering curiosity among the ‘laypersons’ and ‘the experts’ and a debate about industry in the 21st century.


The six metre long hand-drawing will be exhibited during a symposium on the ‘aesthetics of industry in the 21st century’ in 2019. The drawing is a combination drawing on halftone paper, bringing together scientific drawing techniques of the 19th century with contemporary architectural renderings.

Hyperbolic ponds as a Winogradsky column around the three mine shafts of the Maurits Mine.

Waterfall under the cooling towers, with new physcomitrella patens moss wall.

Brave New Substrate


a new substate for an old mine

Brave New Substrate


a new substate for an old mine
Brave New Substrate questions the role of architecture in our biochemical future. Knowledge development is made perceivable by radical new forms-of-life; extremophiles growing on the industrial heritage on a functioning industrial site.
File under
Type of project
  • New areas of operation

Brave New Substrate – is a research-by-design project investigating the biochemical future of the functioning industrial area ‘De Maurits’ in the South of the Netherlands. Over the course of history, the coal mine has transformed into a petrochemical complex that is now on the eve of the ‘biotech revolution’. In what ways can architecture contribute to the development of radical new industries at the beginning of our ‘biochemical’ anthropocene?

Exploring three landscape-experiments; a sulphate warehouse, abandoned mine shafts and the functioning cooling tower as substrates to new biochemical experiments. Hot water from the cooling tower, polluted water from the mine shafts and plastic mountains in the sulphate warehouse will form a new habitat for the isolated microbal life. Industrial heritage and knowledge development will be made perceivable in a radical new way, by fostering curiosity among the ‘laypersons’ and ‘the experts’ and a debate about industry in the 21st century.


The six metre long hand-drawing will be exhibited during a symposium on the ‘aesthetics of industry in the 21st century’ in 2019. The drawing is a combination drawing on halftone paper, bringing together scientific drawing techniques of the 19th century with contemporary architectural renderings.

Hyperbolic ponds as a Winogradsky column around the three mine shafts of the Maurits Mine.

Waterfall under the cooling towers, with new physcomitrella patens moss wall.


Idea by

David Habets
Stromarkt 3
Amsterdam
Netherlands
David Habets has a background in applied physics and (landscape) architecture at the University Eindhoven and Academy of Architecture Amsterdam (NL). He worked as a freelance researcher and architect at TNO and the AMC. In addition to this David has been intensively involved at RAAAF from 2011 – present [Deltawerk // – Breaking Habits – Trusted Strangers]. Combining professional fields David is interested in the embodiment of our thoughts, work and habits in our landscapes.