We would prefer not to


organising digital communication black out to accommodate collective unproductive activities : sleeping

We would prefer not to


organising digital communication black out to accommodate collective unproductive activities : sleeping
An excess of collective production tuning into the physical and digital realms forcing the city 24/7 productive mode into a sleep mode.
File under
  • # Technology
  • # Social
  • # Infrastructure

What if the future of architecture was based on a paradox?

Architecture could be based on collective production in order to be unproductive and become a high performance vehicle, merging communication infrastructure and public spaces.

Architecture could celebrate this paradox and target the two forces that have bearing on the public and private spaces of the city (extreme housing speculation and state-run digital communication surveillance). Through an excess of collective production, using a technique known as spoofing, the city's 24/7 productive mode can be forced into a sleep mode.

Architectural collective production could allow for temporary public spaces to emerge sheltering collective activities where the notion of care is essential. For sleep is one of the few remaining experiences where we abandon ourselves to the care of others.


meet by the Grand Union Canal / gather the tools on narrow boats to go sleep and spoof in London.

make your own jammer (spoof) / start occupying the roofs of the luxury flats that have replacing social housing estates

deploy the spoofing shield / reorganise the luxury flat for communal use

enjoy the digital communication black out / have a nap


Idea by

albane duvillier
32 Manchester Road
London
United Kingdom
Lives in London, UK; graduated as Part II RIBA from the AA in 2016 and worked in 2013-2014 for muf architecture /art, in London. Albane Duvillier through her involvement in the current housing struggles in London is trying to push for an inclusive, socially and politically engaged mode of design, considering London’s architectural culture and its inhabitants as the ultimate creative battleground.

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