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Idea by

Elena Pérez-Guembe & Rosana Rubio-Hernández

https://elenaperezguembe.carbonmade.com/

Brooklyn & Lavapies, New York City & Madrid, United States of America
Elena Pérez-Guembe (B. Arch & MS in Urban Planning UN & Rosana Rubio-Hernández (PhD, B. Arch & MS in Architecture ETSAM, UPM), both M. Sc. in ADD & AAR (Columbia University), collaborate since 2006. Their interests include: intersections of art and architecture, and new materials exploration. Elena teaches at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute’s School of Architecture in Troy, and Rosana at the UCJC in Madrid. Their creative work has been published, awarded and exhibited internationally

Mille-Oeille


An architectural response to zoos’ obsolescence in post-anthropocentric times

Mille-Oeille


An architectural response to zoos’ obsolescence in post-anthropocentric times
Grounded in empathic ties consolidated by human-animal interaction, this project claims for a sensitive use of technology supporting environmental and social sustainability.
File under
Type of project
  • Systemic changes

This is an alternative to the inherited old-fashioned notion of buildings and recreational parks based on animal captivity for “educational purposes”. It is an invitation to re-think the basic principles of our interaction with both the human and the non-human (animals, plants, landscape and our technologically mediated world) on a planetary scale. It works as a multilayered information system on the world’s ecosystems. It stresses the power of architecture as a tool for positive affection and planetary preservation, educational and societal growth through the build-up of empathic relationships. It also claims for the civic responsibility of the architect in this task. As new forms of thinking and being in the world might require to be expressed by other type of materialities, the Colored Liquid Crystal (CLC), a new material, expresses the qualities and potentials of new paradigms through this specific architectural case study.



Night view

Section perspective

Thousand eyes in the world

Thousand leyers, program distribution

A new material. CLC, Colored Liquid Crystal

Mille-Oeille


An architectural response to zoos’ obsolescence in post-anthropocentric times

Mille-Oeille


An architectural response to zoos’ obsolescence in post-anthropocentric times
Grounded in empathic ties consolidated by human-animal interaction, this project claims for a sensitive use of technology supporting environmental and social sustainability.
File under
Type of project
  • Systemic changes

This is an alternative to the inherited old-fashioned notion of buildings and recreational parks based on animal captivity for “educational purposes”. It is an invitation to re-think the basic principles of our interaction with both the human and the non-human (animals, plants, landscape and our technologically mediated world) on a planetary scale. It works as a multilayered information system on the world’s ecosystems. It stresses the power of architecture as a tool for positive affection and planetary preservation, educational and societal growth through the build-up of empathic relationships. It also claims for the civic responsibility of the architect in this task. As new forms of thinking and being in the world might require to be expressed by other type of materialities, the Colored Liquid Crystal (CLC), a new material, expresses the qualities and potentials of new paradigms through this specific architectural case study.



Night view

Section perspective

Thousand eyes in the world

Thousand leyers, program distribution

A new material. CLC, Colored Liquid Crystal


Idea by

Elena Pérez-Guembe & Rosana Rubio-Hernández
Brooklyn & Lavapies
New York City & Madrid
United States of America
Elena Pérez-Guembe (B. Arch & MS in Urban Planning UN & Rosana Rubio-Hernández (PhD, B. Arch & MS in Architecture ETSAM, UPM), both M. Sc. in ADD & AAR (Columbia University), collaborate since 2006. Their interests include: intersections of art and architecture, and new materials exploration. Elena teaches at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute’s School of Architecture in Troy, and Rosana at the UCJC in Madrid. Their creative work has been published, awarded and exhibited internationally