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Idea by

Dieter Leyssen

KULeuven

Rouppeplein, 27, Brussels, Belgium
Dieter Leyssen is an architect and urban sociologist. He holds a master in Architecture from KULeuven and in City Design and Social Sciences from LSE. He published in the Architectural Review, Joelho Journal of Architectural Culture and Oase Journal of Architecture. Since 2019 he is a partner at Brussels-based international practice 51N4E, where he is responsible for projects in civic design and adaptive infrastructure. He currently teaches urban design at KULeuven and UHasselt.

Call for ideas 2020

Why do we practice ?


Trauma, activism and guilty pleasure in Future Architecture

Why do we practice ?


Trauma, activism and guilty pleasure in Future Architecture
A short story about the underlying motivations of FA's practices
File under
Type of project
  • Next alliances

Many reports on architecture emphasize the results of its practice: new buildings, public spaces, studies, and theories. Perhaps rightfully so, as these transformations directly affect people’s daily lives. The individual motivations of the practitioners behind the project are rendered trivial. Yet those personal histories provide a fascinating insight into how and why a practice develops. I developed this thesis at LSE in an essay on Urban Trauma (see project section). My interest in the writing grand lies in revealing the underlying motivations of FA's architectural practices. I will focus on the difficult, hard-to-pin-down drivers that branch outside the professional realm: personal or collective trauma, events of political activism, or ‘guilty pleasures’. The piece can take many forms: a mind map of crucial events? A psycho-analytic exercise? It should, however, go beyond cliché's and reveal the underexposed motivations of the selected practices.


Leyssen D. (2018). Meanwhile Use as an Act of Resistance. Joelho. Revista de Cultura Arquitectónica

Grommen C, Leyssen D., Royakkers M. (2019). Seasonal Neighbours. The social role of seasonal migrant workers in horticulture in Haspengouw. Oase. Journal of Architecture

Why do we practice ?


Trauma, activism and guilty pleasure in Future Architecture

Why do we practice ?


Trauma, activism and guilty pleasure in Future Architecture
A short story about the underlying motivations of FA's practices
File under
Type of project
  • Next alliances

Many reports on architecture emphasize the results of its practice: new buildings, public spaces, studies, and theories. Perhaps rightfully so, as these transformations directly affect people’s daily lives. The individual motivations of the practitioners behind the project are rendered trivial. Yet those personal histories provide a fascinating insight into how and why a practice develops. I developed this thesis at LSE in an essay on Urban Trauma (see project section). My interest in the writing grand lies in revealing the underlying motivations of FA's architectural practices. I will focus on the difficult, hard-to-pin-down drivers that branch outside the professional realm: personal or collective trauma, events of political activism, or ‘guilty pleasures’. The piece can take many forms: a mind map of crucial events? A psycho-analytic exercise? It should, however, go beyond cliché's and reveal the underexposed motivations of the selected practices.


Leyssen D. (2018). Meanwhile Use as an Act of Resistance. Joelho. Revista de Cultura Arquitectónica

Grommen C, Leyssen D., Royakkers M. (2019). Seasonal Neighbours. The social role of seasonal migrant workers in horticulture in Haspengouw. Oase. Journal of Architecture


Idea by

Dieter Leyssen
KULeuven
Rouppeplein, 27
Brussels
Belgium
Dieter Leyssen is an architect and urban sociologist. He holds a master in Architecture from KULeuven and in City Design and Social Sciences from LSE. He published in the Architectural Review, Joelho Journal of Architectural Culture and Oase Journal of Architecture. Since 2019 he is a partner at Brussels-based international practice 51N4E, where he is responsible for projects in civic design and adaptive infrastructure. He currently teaches urban design at KULeuven and UHasselt.