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Idea by

Stephanie Kyuyoung Lee

Office of Human Resources

http://www.officeofhumanresources.com

49 St Nicholas Terrace, New York, United States of America
Stephanie Kyuyoung Lee is a spatial practitioner and researcher based in New York. Her practice often explores the intersection of post-colonial anxiety and mechanical labor systems in the built/non-built environment. Trained as an architect, Stephanie studied Cultural Anthropology and Studio Art at Wesleyan University. She received her Master of Architecture from Rice University where she was a recipient of several fellowships and grants. She is currently a wageworker at Carlo Ratti Associati.

Agro Commune


Global Floriculture Network in Lake Naivasha, Kenya

Agro Commune


Global Floriculture Network in Lake Naivasha, Kenya
An agro-industrial prototype imagines the post-capitalist future for smallholder farmers
File under
Type of project
  • Systemic changes

Foreign corporations are vehemently irrigating rural corners of sub-Saharan Africa, displacing local smallholders from their land to secure stable supplies for the rest of the world. Following the global food crisis of 2007-2008, there has been an exponential amount of large-scale land acquisition in Africa. Foreign “land grabs” are redrawing the global map of farmland ownership as foreign direct investments continue the legacy of colonization. Western, Chinese, and Middle Eastern companies are leading a 21st-century land rush in African farmland where more than a hundred million acres are under a 99-year lease. Greenhouse colonies have become architectural representations of these unequal exchanges fostered by global capitalism.
The five scroll mural (included in work samples) highlights systems of rural development and ecological resilience. The visual mural detailed phases of geographical expansion, connecting local farmers to a larger co-operative base.



The production system of Kenyan floriculture is a complex web of biological, mechanical and socioeconomic relationships. The former British Colony is one of the biggest suppliers of bouquets to Europe. Heavily monopolized by Dutch corporations, the multimillion-dollar cut-flower industry accounts for 35% of all flower sales in the European Union. However, 90 percent of the farm operations are foreign-owned. Scroll #1 describes future rural conditions based on research on social farming.

Scroll #2 describes the Safari Condition and local flower production near lake Naivasha. National Safari tourism dominates the local economy next to its floricultural production.

Scroll #3 detailing Industrial Condition and local flower production

Scroll #4 detailing Lake Naivasha's Condition and local tourism

Scroll #5 Site Plan at farm-scale (based on existing Aquila Farm) and global flower trade system from Westland, Netherlands.

Agro Commune


Global Floriculture Network in Lake Naivasha, Kenya

Agro Commune


Global Floriculture Network in Lake Naivasha, Kenya
An agro-industrial prototype imagines the post-capitalist future for smallholder farmers
File under
Type of project
  • Systemic changes

Foreign corporations are vehemently irrigating rural corners of sub-Saharan Africa, displacing local smallholders from their land to secure stable supplies for the rest of the world. Following the global food crisis of 2007-2008, there has been an exponential amount of large-scale land acquisition in Africa. Foreign “land grabs” are redrawing the global map of farmland ownership as foreign direct investments continue the legacy of colonization. Western, Chinese, and Middle Eastern companies are leading a 21st-century land rush in African farmland where more than a hundred million acres are under a 99-year lease. Greenhouse colonies have become architectural representations of these unequal exchanges fostered by global capitalism.
The five scroll mural (included in work samples) highlights systems of rural development and ecological resilience. The visual mural detailed phases of geographical expansion, connecting local farmers to a larger co-operative base.



The production system of Kenyan floriculture is a complex web of biological, mechanical and socioeconomic relationships. The former British Colony is one of the biggest suppliers of bouquets to Europe. Heavily monopolized by Dutch corporations, the multimillion-dollar cut-flower industry accounts for 35% of all flower sales in the European Union. However, 90 percent of the farm operations are foreign-owned. Scroll #1 describes future rural conditions based on research on social farming.

Scroll #2 describes the Safari Condition and local flower production near lake Naivasha. National Safari tourism dominates the local economy next to its floricultural production.

Scroll #3 detailing Industrial Condition and local flower production

Scroll #4 detailing Lake Naivasha's Condition and local tourism

Scroll #5 Site Plan at farm-scale (based on existing Aquila Farm) and global flower trade system from Westland, Netherlands.


Idea by

Stephanie Kyuyoung Lee
Office of Human Resources
49 St Nicholas Terrace
New York
United States of America
Stephanie Kyuyoung Lee is a spatial practitioner and researcher based in New York. Her practice often explores the intersection of post-colonial anxiety and mechanical labor systems in the built/non-built environment. Trained as an architect, Stephanie studied Cultural Anthropology and Studio Art at Wesleyan University. She received her Master of Architecture from Rice University where she was a recipient of several fellowships and grants. She is currently a wageworker at Carlo Ratti Associati.