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Idea by

Marco Moro, Paolo Pisano, Sabrina Puddu, Francesco Zuddas

Urbanaarchitettura

London, United Kingdom
We are a collective of architects, teachers and researchers with an interest in the relation between architecture and the city via the formation, reformation, and de-structuring of institutions. We have taught at the AA, the RCA, Central Saint Martins, the Leeds School of Architecture, the Cass, the University of Cagliari, Anglia Ruskin University, and Universidad Catolica del Norte. Our work and writings are published on AA Files, Domus, OASE, MONU, San Rocco, and the Funambulist.

Call for ideas 2020

Institutes of Care


Spaces of (de)institutionalized collectivity

Institutes of Care


Spaces of (de)institutionalized collectivity
We want to pull together a reflection on the future of the modern institutes of care, a legacy that testifies of 19th and 20th century architecture’s sense of responsibility towards the establishment and materialisation of a public-driven attitude to educate, reform, heal, and domesticate.
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Type of project
  • Next alliances

We live in an age of ruins. The ruins of the welfare state in its various ideological and geopolitical embodiments in the form of those institutions that have been carefully choreographed to shape modern territories of top-down, domesticated, collectivised life.

From education to healthcare, confinement to mental treatment, their architectures have often been relocated, sent to exile, vacated, forgotten, repudiated, or simply left to their own destiny in a state of controlled decay. Yet they might still be a resource for reinventing modes of living together.

As opposed to market-driven neoliberal euphory to reinvent these places – read: the cultural center, the luxury hotel, the creative hub, the innovation campus, etc. – their fossils are particularly problematic in less booming economies. What to do, beyond their musealisation, or final commodification?

We think that precisely in the ruin of an institution lies the prospect of a de-institutionalised idea of collectivity.

Institutes of Care


Spaces of (de)institutionalized collectivity

Institutes of Care


Spaces of (de)institutionalized collectivity
We want to pull together a reflection on the future of the modern institutes of care, a legacy that testifies of 19th and 20th century architecture’s sense of responsibility towards the establishment and materialisation of a public-driven attitude to educate, reform, heal, and domesticate.
File under
Type of project
  • Next alliances

We live in an age of ruins. The ruins of the welfare state in its various ideological and geopolitical embodiments in the form of those institutions that have been carefully choreographed to shape modern territories of top-down, domesticated, collectivised life.

From education to healthcare, confinement to mental treatment, their architectures have often been relocated, sent to exile, vacated, forgotten, repudiated, or simply left to their own destiny in a state of controlled decay. Yet they might still be a resource for reinventing modes of living together.

As opposed to market-driven neoliberal euphory to reinvent these places – read: the cultural center, the luxury hotel, the creative hub, the innovation campus, etc. – their fossils are particularly problematic in less booming economies. What to do, beyond their musealisation, or final commodification?

We think that precisely in the ruin of an institution lies the prospect of a de-institutionalised idea of collectivity.


Idea by

Marco Moro, Paolo Pisano, Sabrina Puddu, Francesco Zuddas
Urbanaarchitettura
London
United Kingdom
We are a collective of architects, teachers and researchers with an interest in the relation between architecture and the city via the formation, reformation, and de-structuring of institutions. We have taught at the AA, the RCA, Central Saint Martins, the Leeds School of Architecture, the Cass, the University of Cagliari, Anglia Ruskin University, and Universidad Catolica del Norte. Our work and writings are published on AA Files, Domus, OASE, MONU, San Rocco, and the Funambulist.